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Parrot Weight Chart: Why You Should Track Your Bird's Weight

Bird weight chart

Keeping an eye on your bird's weight is one of the best things that you can do for it. But, it's also important to know what your bird's particular species should weigh. Keep in mind that there is a range of acceptable wait even amongst birds of the same species.

Since birds hide their illnesses, injuries, and pain, one of the first clues that something is wrong is  often a drop in weight. A lot of people think that they can just pick up their bird and tell whether it's losing weight. However, losing just 10% of its weight is harmful and an indication that something is wrong.

My Congo African grey, named Smokey, weighs  492 grams.  10% of his weight is 49 grams. That's a little less than 2 oz. If he were to lose 2 ounces over the course of, say, two months, I wouldn't be able to detect that minute weight loss. By the time I noticed that he had been losing weight it might be too late. That’s why keeping a running tally of your bird's weight is important. 

At BirdSupplies.com we're all about parrot wellness and one way to keep your parrot well is to help it to maintain an appropriate weight.

Table of Contents

Keeping an eye on your bird's weight is one of the best things that you can do for it. But, it's also important to know what your bird's particular species should weigh. Keep in mind that there is a range of acceptable wait even amongst birds of the same species.

Since birds hide their illnesses, injuries, and pain, one of the first clues that something is wrong is  often a drop in weight. A lot of people think that they can just pick up their bird and tell whether it's losing weight. However, losing just 10% of its weight is harmful and an indication that something is wrong.

My Congo African grey, named Smokey, weighs  492 grams.  10% of his weight is 49 grams. That's a little less than 2 oz. If he were to lose 2 ounces over the course of, say, two months, I wouldn't be able to detect that minute weight loss. By the time I noticed that he had been losing weight it might be too late. That’s why keeping a running tally of your bird's weight is important. 

BirdSupplies.com we're all about parrot wellness and one way to keep your parrot well is to help it to maintain an appropriate weight.

How Often Should You Weigh Your Bird?

People often ask how often should I weigh my bird. I like to encourage people to get into a routine of weighing their bird once a week, on the same day, and preferably before breakfast. You can keep a running chart on your bird's wait every week. You'll probably notice that your bird's weight fluctuates a little bit,  just like yours. That's okay.

What you're actually looking for is a slow and steady downward spiral. If that happens give your avian vet a call.

Is it bad if my bird is overweight?

Just like with people birds can experience complications from being overweight. If your bird weighs 15% over its ideal weight it may be considered to be obese. Ask your avian vet what your bird's ideal weight should be in grams.

One complication of being overweight is  the toll it takes on the cardiovascular system. Excess fat can develop around the heart requiring it to work harder to circulate  blood.  Plus, fatty deposits can clog up veins and arteries leaving your bird susceptible to a stroke or an aneurysm.

Another complication of being overweight is the effect it has on your birds joints. Namely, the joints and its legs and feet which have to carry the excess weight.  If your bird is overweight it causes the legs and the hips to splay in a widened stance.  All this wear and tear can cause a painful arthritic condition as your bird ages. Not only that, your bird will have difficulties tolerating normal exercise, causing a snowball effect of overall poor health.

Finally, overweight birds are prone to acquiring deadly fatty liver disease. A bird with Fatty liver disease is more prone to developing  symptoms of stress and have difficulties with its immune system. 

All of these fatty deposits in the body can also impaired normal organ functioning. Your vet can perform a variety of tests to determine if critical organs are not functioning properly

How do you make an obese bird lose weight?

As you've read, obesity in birds causes several painful and life-threatening problems. so, you'll want to help your bird achieve an optimum weight and maintain it.

The first thing you're going to want to do is improve your bird's diet. Avian nutrition experts tell us that feeding your bird a premium, organic pellet, like Harrison's Bird Food, Roudybush, or TOPs is important but you’ll want to  supplement pellets with a good range of fresh, uncooked, plant-based foods.

 If you're unsure of how to get your bird to eat more vegetables and plant-based Foods, check out my video on 9 ways to get your parrot to eat its veggies. Another great resource is the parrots fine cuisine cookbook. you'll learn about the nutritional values of different plant-based foods and get a ton of tasty recipes that you can make for your bird.

Now, take a look at the treats that you've been giving your bird. A lot of bird treats are empty calories. They are often high in sugar and fat. Save the treats for special occasions and training purposes.

Finally, you can help your obese bird lose weight by increasing its opportunities to exercise. Evaluate your bird's cage size and climbing opportunities. Get your bird a play stand to climb about on. You can encourage your bird to move about the play stand by placing stations with healthy foods in them In different areas. This is a great way to ward off boredom too!

What is a good weight for a bird? 

 Below is a chart showing the average weight of different species of birds. But once again, you'll want to ask your  avian vet what the ideal weight is for your bird?

Average Bird Weight Chart

BIRD

TYPE

SPECIES

Average Adult Weight (grams)

AMAZONS

Blue-fronted

275-510 

Cuban

240

Double Yellow-headed

450-650

Green-cheeked

270

Lilac-crowned

325

Mealy

540-700

Orange-winged

360-490

Spectacled (White Front)

205-235

Tres Marias

500

Tucuman

320

Red-lored

350

Yellow-billed

260

Yellow-fronted

380-480

Yellow-naped

480-680

Yellow-shouldered

270

Vinaceous

370

CAIQUES

   

Black-headed

145-170

White-bellied

165

COCKATOOS

   

Galah

345

GangGang

280

Goffin's

221-386

Greater Sulphur-crested

880

Lesser Sulphur-crested

350

Moluccan

640-1025

Palm

900 (Adults range from 600-1000)

Rose-breasted

281-390

Umbrella

458-750

CONURES

   

Blue-crowned

84-100

Dusky

90

Greater Patagonian

315-390

Green-cheeked

60-80

Jenday

120

Lesser Patagonian

240-310

Mitred

200

Nanday

140

Orange-fronted

73

Painted

55

Queen of Bavaria's

270

Red-masked

200

Sun

100-130

Whiteeyed

140

LORY

   

Blue-streaked

160

Chattering

200

Dusky

155

Rainbow

130

Red

170

LOVEBIRDS

   

Fisher's

50

Masked

50 (most females weigh more than males)

Peach-faced

55

MACAWS

   

Blue and Gold

800-1292

Green-winged

900-1529

Hahn's

165

Hyacinth

1200-1450

Illiger's

265

Lear's

940

Military

900

Noble

190

Red-fronted

525

Scarlet

900-1100

Severe

360

Spix's

360

Yellow-collared

250

POPULAR PET BIRDS

   

African Ringneck

105

Canary

12-29

Cockatiel

90

Eclectus

375-550

Indian Ringneck

115

Kea

1000

Pacific Parrotlet

31-34

Red-fronted Kakariki

100

St. Vincent

580-700

Zebra Finch

10-16

PARAKEETS

   

Alexandrine

250

Barraband's

140

Bourke's

50

Budgerigar

25-60

Canary-winged

70

Crimson Rosella

145

Derbyan

320

Golden-manteled

100

Grey-cheeked

45-60

Moustache

110-140

Plum-headed

90

Quaker or Monk

90-150

Red-rumped

60

MISC

PARROTS

   

Brown-headed

125

Cape

320

Great-billed

260

Greater Vasa

480

Congo Grey

400-650

Hawk-headed

250

Jardine's

200

Lesser Vasa

280

Meyer's

120

Pesquet's

700

Red-bellied

125

Scarlet-chested

40

Senegal

110-130

Timneh Grey

300-360

PIONUS

   

Blue-headed

230-260

Bronze-winged

210

Dusky

200

White-capped

180

 

Get your own parrot weight tracker here and keep track of your birds weight

Visit www.hagen.com/hari 

 

UnRuffledRx Feather plucking help

How Often Should You Weigh Your Bird?

People often ask how often should I weigh my bird. I like to encourage people to get into a routine of weighing their bird once a week, on the same day, and preferably before breakfast. You can keep a running chart on your bird's wait every week. You'll probably notice that your bird's weight fluctuates a little bit,  just like yours. That's okay.

What you're actually looking for is a slow and steady downward spiral. If that happens give your avian vet a call.

Is it bad if my bird is overweight?

Just like with people birds can experience complications from being overweight. If your bird weighs 15% over its ideal weight it may be considered to be obese. Ask your avian vet what your bird's ideal weight should be in grams.

One complication of being overweight is  the toll it takes on the cardiovascular system. Excess fat can develop around the heart requiring it to work harder to circulate  blood.  Plus, fatty deposits can clog up veins and arteries leaving your bird susceptible to a stroke or an aneurysm.

Another complication of being overweight is the effect it has on your birds joints. Namely, the joints and its legs and feet which have to carry the excess weight.  If your bird is overweight it causes the legs and the hips to splay in a widened stance.  All this wear and tear can cause a painful arthritic condition as your bird ages. Not only that, your bird will have difficulties tolerating normal exercise, causing a snowball effect of overall poor health.

Finally, overweight birds are prone to acquiring deadly fatty liver disease. A bird with Fatty liver disease is more prone to developing  symptoms of stress and have difficulties with its immune system. 

All of these fatty deposits in the body can also impaired normal organ functioning. Your vet can perform a variety of tests to determine if critical organs are not functioning properly

How do you make an obese bird lose weight?

As you've read, obesity in birds causes several painful and life-threatening problems. So, you'll want to help your bird achieve an optimum weight and maintain it.

The first thing you're going to want to do is improve your bird's diet. Avian nutrition experts tell us that feeding your bird a premium, organic pellet, like Harrison's Bird Food, Roudybush, or TOPs is important but you’ll want to  supplement pellets with a good range of fresh, uncooked, plant-based foods.

 

If you're unsure of how to get your bird to eat more vegetables and plant-based foods, check out my video on 9 Ways To Get Your Parrot To Eat Its Veggies. Another great resource is the parrots fine cuisine cookbook. you'll learn about the nutritional values of different plant-based foods and get a ton of tasty recipes that you can make for your bird.

 

Now, take a look at the treats that you've been giving your bird. A lot of bird treats are empty calories. They are often high in sugar and fat. Save the treats for special occasions and training purposes.

Finally, you can help your obese bird loose weight by increasing its opportunities to exercise. Evaluate your bird's cage size and climbing opportunities. Get your bird a play stand to climb about on. You can encourage your bird to move about the play stand by placing stations with healthy foods in them In different areas. This is a great way to ward off boredom too!

What is a good weight for a bird? 

Below is a chart showing the average weight of different species of birds. But once again, you'll want to ask your  avian vet what the ideal weight is for your bird?

Average Bird Weight By Species

BIRD TYPE

TYPE

SPECIES

Average Adult Weight (grams)

AMAZONS

Blue-fronted

275-510 

Cuban

240

Double Yellow-headed

450-650

Green-cheeked

270

Lilac-crowned

325

Mealy

540-700

Orange-winged

360-490

Spectacled (White Front)

205-235

Tres Marias

500

Tucuman

320

Red-lored

350

Yellow-billed

260

Yellow-fronted

380-480

Yellow-naped

480-680

Yellow-shouldered

270

Vinaceous

370

CAIQUES

   

Black-headed

145-170

White-bellied

165

COCKATOOS

   

Galah

345

GangGang

280

Goffin's

221-386

Greater Sulphur-crested

880

Lesser Sulphur-crested

350

Moluccan

640-1025

Palm

900 (Adults range from 600-1000)

Rose-breasted

281-390

Umbrella

458-750

CONURES

   

Blue-crowned

84-100

Dusky

90

Greater Patagonian

315-390

Green-cheeked

60-80

Jenday

120

Lesser Patagonian

240-310

Mitred

200

Nanday

140

Orange-fronted

73

Painted

55

Queen of Bavaria's

270

Red-masked

200

Sun

100-130

Whiteeyed

140

LORY

   

Blue-streaked

160

Chattering

200

Dusky

155

Rainbow

130

Red

170

LOVEBIRDS

   

Fisher's

50

Masked

50 (most females weigh more than males)

Peach-faced

55

MACAWS

   

Blue and Gold

800-1292

Green-winged

900-1529

Hahn's

165

Hyacinth

1200-1450

Illiger's

265

Lear's

940

Military

900

Noble

190

Red-fronted

525

Scarlet

900-1100

Severe

360

Spix's

360

Yellow-collared

250

POPULAR PET BIRDS

   

African Ringneck

105

Canary

12-29

Cockatiel

90

Eclectus

375-550

Indian Ringneck

115

Kea

1000

Pacific Parrotlet

31-34

Red-fronted Kakariki

100

St. Vincent

580-700

Zebra Finch

10-16

PARAKEETS

   

Alexandrine

250

Barraband's

140

Bourke's

50

Budgerigar

25-60

Canary-winged

70

Crimson Rosella

145

Derbyan

320

Golden-manteled

100

Grey-cheeked

45-60

Moustache

110-140

Plum-headed

90

Quaker or Monk

90-150

Red-rumped

60

MISC

PARROTS

   

Brown-headed

125

Cape

320

Great-billed

260

Greater Vasa

480

Congo Grey

400-650

Hawk-headed

250

Jardine's

200

Lesser Vasa

280

Meyer's

120

Pesquet's

700

Red-bellied

125

Scarlet-chested

40

Senegal

110-130

Timneh Grey

300-360

PIONUS

   

Blue-headed

230-260

Bronze-winged

210

Dusky

200

White-capped

180

 

Get your own parrot weight tracker here and keep track of your birds weight

Visit www.hagen.com/hari 

 

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